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Dec
15

YOGHURT

Posted by admin

Live yoghurt contains ‘friendly’ bacteria which form lactic acid in milk, suppressing the growth of harmful bacteria. Some of the bacteria which are used to make yoghurt are Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus. The bacteria in many yoghurts are still alive, but are kept dormant by refrigeration. However yoghurts which have been pasteurised or otherwise treated by heat, no longer contain live organisms.

Yoghurt is often recommended for its nutritional properties: it is a good source of protein, calcium and other minerals and A and B vitamins. Because yoghurt also contains lactose, the calcium is readily absorbed by the body. Yoghurt stimulates the synthesis of lactase, so that some people with a lactose intolerance are able to eat it without ill effect.

The inclusion of yoghurt in the diet is useful in preventing the proliferation of toxic intestinal bacteria which are often introduced into the body by contaminated foods. There are substances in yoghurt which have an antibiotic effect in the gut, reducing the concentrations of pathogenic bacteria such as E. coli so that a balanced concentration of friendly bacteria is encouraged. As a result, yoghurt may be beneficial in treating diarrhoea and other digestive disorders.

In the treatment of thrush or Candida, live acidophilus and bifidus bacteria can help to recolonise gut flora which have become unbalanced by the fungus. The lactobacilli in live yoghurt are the same which normally inhabit the vagina, so when these have been killed by some cause, such as a course of antibiotics, yoghurt inserted into the vagina for a few days, either with a spoon or a plunger, is often of benefit.

Orotic acid, a substance found in some yoghurts, interferes with the synthesis of cholesterol in the liver. Inclusion of acidophilus and bifidus yoghurts in the diet is therefore recommended in the prevention of heart disease.

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